Event Title

Creating Consent Culture in Early Childhood Classrooms

Presenter Information

Zoe Morris, Ohio Wesleyan University

Presentation Type

Poster

Location

Schimmel/Conrades Science Center Atrium

Start Date

15-4-2015 6:15 PM

End Date

15-4-2015 7:45 PM

Disciplines

Early Childhood Education

Abstract

In this presentation, I explain how the explicit and implicit instruction in early childhood programs can impact rape culture in American society, Research proves that quality early childhood education (birth to age 8) can have dramatic effects on a person’s success in school and beyond. Early childhood education provides not only important academic benefits, but also many children’s first relationships with people outside of their own families. These formative years have potential to have lasting effects on how children perceive themselves and others. The messages we send students unintentionally and intentionally in school settings can help to perpetuate or mitigate rape culture. Teachers can promote a culture of consent both implicitly by using empowering management and discipline methods, and explicitly by answering students question about their bodies and preventing the taboo and shame that can: surround natural curiosity about bodies. In my presentation I will discuss some of the “traditional” education practices and systems that perpetuate rape culture, and the empowering practices that can help bring about a culture of consent

Faculty Mentor

Katherine Glenn-Applegate

 
Apr 15th, 6:15 PM Apr 15th, 7:45 PM

Creating Consent Culture in Early Childhood Classrooms

Schimmel/Conrades Science Center Atrium

In this presentation, I explain how the explicit and implicit instruction in early childhood programs can impact rape culture in American society, Research proves that quality early childhood education (birth to age 8) can have dramatic effects on a person’s success in school and beyond. Early childhood education provides not only important academic benefits, but also many children’s first relationships with people outside of their own families. These formative years have potential to have lasting effects on how children perceive themselves and others. The messages we send students unintentionally and intentionally in school settings can help to perpetuate or mitigate rape culture. Teachers can promote a culture of consent both implicitly by using empowering management and discipline methods, and explicitly by answering students question about their bodies and preventing the taboo and shame that can: surround natural curiosity about bodies. In my presentation I will discuss some of the “traditional” education practices and systems that perpetuate rape culture, and the empowering practices that can help bring about a culture of consent