Event Title

Development of a Brain Controlled Video Game

Presentation Type

Presentation

Location

Schimmel/Conrades Science Center 151

Start Date

15-4-2015 4:15 PM

End Date

15-4-2015 4:30 PM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) enable control of computer programs by brain signals. BCIs are used in various applications—for example, the P300 Speller is a BCI that enables people with ALS to spell words using their brain signals alone. We developed a basic BCI consisting of a simple computer game controlled by brain signals recorded using a low-cost EEG headset. When light was flashed on the screen at constant frequency, the same frequency was observed in brain waves recorded from the user’s visual cortex. Two different blinking lights were displayed on the computer screen simultaneously. By choosing which blinking light to look at, the user determined the direction of a moving ball in the computer game. This system is simple enough to be implemented as a pedagogical tool in the classroom.

Faculty Mentor

Christian Fink

 
Apr 15th, 4:15 PM Apr 15th, 4:30 PM

Development of a Brain Controlled Video Game

Schimmel/Conrades Science Center 151

Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) enable control of computer programs by brain signals. BCIs are used in various applications—for example, the P300 Speller is a BCI that enables people with ALS to spell words using their brain signals alone. We developed a basic BCI consisting of a simple computer game controlled by brain signals recorded using a low-cost EEG headset. When light was flashed on the screen at constant frequency, the same frequency was observed in brain waves recorded from the user’s visual cortex. Two different blinking lights were displayed on the computer screen simultaneously. By choosing which blinking light to look at, the user determined the direction of a moving ball in the computer game. This system is simple enough to be implemented as a pedagogical tool in the classroom.